A Summer to Remember

Posted on 24 June 2019

With the official kickoff of the next season upon us, I always reflect on my tremendous upbringing and how the time between academic yearsknown to most as ‘summer vacation’was handled. For most young people, these next few months are a time of rest and relaxation; a time to turn off the alarm clocks, cease learning and enjoy fun in the sun. I grew up, however, learning that regardless of the time of year all work was a privilege, that every task must be done with excellence, and that every job contained learning experiences which held the seeds to more significant positions. So it didn’t make much sense to take a vacation from that.


There was no sleeping in and hanging out with friends for days on end for me. Summer jobs were expected, even when I entered college. I flipped burgers, handled the cash register, handled customer service in a department store, and worked at the Word of Life summer camp programs where I did everything from waitressing to housekeeping. I even sold books door-to-door for two summers with the Southernwestern Book Company (now Southwestern Advantage). Work is fun if you do it with the right attitude. And we all have a responsibility to earn our way in life to provide for ourselves, give back to our government, and help others in need. 


My view of wealth was that it could be used as a ministry to help others who would then create more wealth which would go on to help others. That’s how we collectively make the world a more tremendous place. Hugs and prayers are great, but sometimes someone needs a meal, or a home rebuilt, or education, or a safe space. Our blessings should become others blessings. That is at the root of our company, which is a for-profit entity with a non-profit heart giving over $1M since 2009thanks to supporters like you.


So while we're on the topic of wealth, let's talk about poverty. One of the main reasons for poverty is laziness. The Bible has some pretty direct terms for the shortage of resources caused by a lack of effort: sluggard, slothful servant, idle, and slack hand. I heard it described beautifully once: people need a hand up, not a handout.


There is much conflicting information swirling about regarding wealth and poverty, when the two are not at odds with one anotherespecially in this country. Being given everything without work enslaves the individual to a lifetime of entitlement and entrenchment. Having to work for everything liberates the individual to a lifetime of excitement and experience. The choice is up to each one of us, and that ownership cannot be displaced to upbringing or external circumstances. Why? Because we all have greatness in us and it’s up to us to activate it. There are countless folks and resources to help you ignite; if you don’t, that’s on you.



Are there advantages to poverty? Dare I even ask the question in today's politically sensitive world? Of course there are! Just because a truth is unpopular doesn't dilute its power. We recently saw a massive influx of orders for Andrew Carnegie's classic, Advantages of Poverty when one of the top influencers in real estate, Brian Buffini, recommended it on his podcast. Andrew Carnegie came from abject poverty and made more millionaires than any man who ever lived. He also gave Napoleon Hill access to the men who capitalized on the opportunities found in labor he provided, from which Hill distilled and organized the wisdom of how great men, such as Edison, Firestone, and Ford, achieved success. The result was the perennial personal development classic, Think and Grow Rich. Summer is a tremendous time to hone your reading skills, grow your experience bag, and learn new skills and make this a summer to remember for you and so many others!!

More Posts

3 comments

  • Mary Brunski: June 25, 2019

    For Jeremy: Try Meet-up for activities in your area. My niece used it successfully to find friends in England and China, and then when she moved back to the States. You can search through the interests and find like-minded folks. Good luck!

  • Shirl: June 25, 2019

    Tracey, I could not agree with you more. The “handout” cycle just perpetuates itself. On TV a few months ago, there was a young girl with a small child. She told the reporter that her mom had brought her to the organization giving food and clothing away, so now she was bringing her daughter. No husband in either case and no one in the family working. To me, this is so sad.
    My husband and I volunteered several years at the U.M. Home for Children. We heard the phrase “but I had a bad childhood” and yes they did. It’s amazing what parents do to their children when angry or under the influence. But “what are you going to do about it” now that you are away from them? was a phrase very few wanted to hear, they were too entrenched in the system of having hand outs growing up ( which they needed) and thought it should continue all their life. I am blessed to know that we made a difference in a few lives and pray that more progress can be made to make strong, not dependent, individuals.

  • jeremy: June 24, 2019

    We all have seasons we go through in life, I like to refer to them as “chapters” of life. Know this folks..whatever life throws at us, whether it is good or bad, it is only a chapter of life. We can decide how we come out of our life chapters. We could be upset thinking that this always happens to me, but I think just as we are happy in our good times, we should go through our hard times with the right attitude. This will bring us out healthier and wiser.

    As for our choice to work or be lazy, yes this is correct. I have someone in the extended family who has never had to work a day in their life but seems to have the high life easy. This person was a wiz in their high school/ college years and has a masters degree in a very high major, but had never had to work a job and is pushing fifty years old. I can not respect people who choose not to work even though they are not disabled.

    On an unrelated note, in my county ( Dauphin) there is very limited ways to meet new people. This is something I’ve tried taking to county personnel and various organizations. There are limited public events. I have noticed a couple things on websites that look interesting but the are both in other counties..my county just seems as lazy as what Tracey talked about in this blog, and it is unfortunate when people consent to stop promoting public activities.

Leave a comment

All blog comments are checked prior to publishing


How much is:
Answer:*

Let us know you're human

How much is: Answer:*

Search our store

Sale

Unavailable

Sold Out